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Volume 9, Issue 1 (Feb 2021)                   Res Mol Med (RMM) 2021, 9(1): 0-0 | Back to browse issues page

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Zargar M, Jamshidizad A, Rahim-Tayefeh A, Hashemi E, Shabani S, Shamsara M et al . Spata19 Inactivation as a Cause of Oligospermia. Res Mol Med (RMM). 2021; 9 (1)
URL: http://rmm.mazums.ac.ir/article-1-402-en.html
1- tehran university of medical science
2- Department of Animal Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran.
3- tehran university of medical science , Modaresi@tums.ac.ir
Abstract:   (842 Views)
Background: Spermatogenesis associated 19 (Spata19) was introduced as a testis-specific gene that was probably involved in spermatogenesis cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Spata19 inactivation on sperm count.
Materials and Methods: We generated global Spata19 knockout mice by CRISPR/Cas9 nickase technology. Disability was validated in three levels of DNA, RNA, and protein using PCR, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Histological studies were performed for testis. Sperm characteristics were also assessed with CASA software.
Results: Spata19 knockout mice had a 43 nucleotides deletion in exon 4 of this gene. The presence and absence of Spata19 were confirmed in normal and knockout mice, respectively. The presence of Spata19 in normal NMRI mice was detected in the brain, heart, and thymus by semi-nested RT-PCR and in Leydig cells by immunohistochemistry. Histological studies revealed a decrease in sperm count in knockout mice. Also, CASA parameters were significantly reduced (P<0.05).
Conclusion: These data indicate that Spata19 inactivation is a cause of oligospermia, and its role could be beyond an adhesive molecule.
     
Type of Study: Research | Subject: Biology
Received: 2021/01/18 | Accepted: 2021/02/22 | Published: 2021/02/22

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